Solio to Release Solar Hybrid Charger

first_img The new solar hybrid rechargeable device by Solio will be released on October 15, 2007. The Solio H1000 Universal recharger is powered by small solar panels that can hold a charge for up to one year. The device is for the on-the-go back packer or anyone interested in conservation. The great news is the price. The small, sleek and handsome device sells for less than 80 USD.According to the Solio press release, the hand-held device has a universal adapter that is compatible with nearly all electronic devices. It comes ready to use right out of the box. It also comes with adjustable adaptor tips for iPod, iPhone and most MP3 players. It works on GPS devices and most cellular phones. A fully charged Solio H1000 will power a cell phone or provide 10 hours of play time for a MP3 Player. According to Solio the hand-held device solar energy storage breaks down to one hour of sunshine for 15 minutes of cell phone talk time. One hour of sunshine equals 40 minutes of MP3 music time. The alternative cable tip that fits into any USB port is also included. This allows the user to charge the device from any computer. The smart hybrid device has a 1.5 to 5 watts output. It has a 5-6 watt input capability and the Solio Hybrid 1000 measures 198 x 68 x 144 mm. The solar output is .6 watts. The total weight of the device is slightly over a pound. Solio is a company that is dedicated to finding alternative energy sources for electronic devices. The devices may be used for emergency power sources or an alternative energy source. The company has been invited to the 2007 Clinton Global Annual Meeting. Solio has been reviewed and appeared on American TV and popular electronic publications. The application for its use in energy deprived countries or rural areas makes this an exciting new device. The Solio Hybrid 1000 will go on sale October 15, 2007. The Solio Company is taking advanced orders at its web site: solio.com .(c) 2007. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission. New Solio Hybrid Solar Recharger The energy alternative company Solio will release a hand-held solar battery recharger on October 15, 2007. The sleek new design is for use on virtually all electronic devices. It comes with an adaptor tip that can fit into any USB port or charge directly from the sun. The best part is the price. It will sell for less than 80 USD. Citation: Solio to Release Solar Hybrid Charger (2007, September 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-09-solio-solar-hybrid-charger.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Google Chrome extensions to be officially released

first_img Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Google is expected to release its Extensions Gallery for general users of the new Chrome browser this week, possibly at the Add-On Conference on browser extensions to be held on December 11, 2009. Google is a platinum sponsor of the conference. An extensions site was unveiled a couple of weeks ago, but only for the use of developers. Chrome 4.0 beta web browser launched The Google Extensions Gallery is expected to be similar to the Themes Gallery, with a list of available extensions and a download button for each. The gallery will be the first official release for end users. Extensions and support for them will only be available initially for Windows, but they are also expected to be available in future for the coming Mac and Linux versions.Extensions expected to be available include SEO (search engine optimization) extensions to assist in Internet marketing, Shareaholic, a social media extension, Gmail compose, which lets you quickly compose an email through your gmail account, and Quicksearch, which speeds up searches using your favorite search engine. Google Tasks for Chrome will give you complete control of your Google Task List and synchronize it with your Gmail Task List, and for those websites that only work correctly in Internet Explorer, a Chrome IE extension is expected to be available to let you open a tab and view the site in IE without leaving Chrome.Trials of the developer versions of the extensions have shown they can be added or removed easily without the need to restart the Chrome browser. Since Chrome has been developed in open-source, anyone can develop extensions for it and upload them via the Google Chrome Extension Developer Dashboard.The availability of useful extensions for the Chrome browser will mean it is more customizable and possibly a stronger rival to Mozilla Firefox. Firefox can be easily customized by its add-ons, and this is one of the major reasons it has become so popular. Google Chrome is a free browser that runs web pages extremely fast, and a raft of useful extensions may help it to reach Google’s stated of of cornering at least 10% of the browser market share.© 2009 PhysOrg.comcenter_img Citation: Google Chrome extensions to be officially released (2009, December 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-12-google-chrome-extensions.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Bridgestone is demonstrating its AeroBee ereader

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Most e-readers are E-Ink. On devices, such as the very popular Amazon Kindle, they allow users to have a clear and paper-like viewing experience, and no glare in high light or outdoor situations. The E-Ink devices also use less power than devices like the iPad, and therefore have a longer battery life. Citation: Bridgestone is demonstrating its AeroBee e-reader (2011, April 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-bridgestone-aerobee-e-reader.html E Ink, maker of Kindle display, to offer color Explore furthercenter_img More information: www.bridgestone.com/products/d … r/aerobee/index.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com These devices do have some drawbacks as well. The E-Ink devices only do black and while screens, and for the current generation at least, they have a refresh rate that is so low that is makes animation an impossibility. Like all things in technology however those limitations are bound to change. Companies are working on the next generation of E-Ink devices, and Bridgestone is showing off its offering.Bridgestone’s new e-reader, dubbed the AeroBee, features a QR-LPD display that can run at a resolution of 800 x 600. The device is also capable of showing images in color and acting as a touch screen. The machine, which will take input with a stylus, allows users to interact with their text. The device is also flexible. Yes, you read that right, it is flexible.The screen works with a completely new approach to the E-Ink concept. The AeroBee uses black and white electrified powder, which acts like a liquid. When electric current is run though it the black powder is move to the front or back of the display, depending on how the current is applied. The stylus helps to move the powder over the screen, creating new configurations on the screen. With the use of color filters the screen can also apply up to 4,096 colors onto a screen as big as 13.1-inches.No product price or specific time line for launch have been give at this time.last_img read more

Apple wins multitouch and glass process patents

first_img More information: USPTO Patent 1USPTO Patent 2via PatentlyApple © 2012 Phys.org Explore further Apple granted smartphone touchscreen patent (Phys.org)—The US Patent and Trademark Office has published thirty-six patents granted for Apple. Patently Apple has highlighted two of those patents. One has to do with multi-touch displays. The multi-touch patent relates to sensor panels using capacitive sensors to detect and localize touch events. The other patent has to do with new ways to shape glass for iDevices, e.g., the iPhone and iPad. One of the advantages of Apple’s proposed process on glass is that it would not involve dangerous chemicals and gasses.center_img First, in presenting the Touch Sensor Back Plane Ground Connection, which was filed by Thayne Miller in July last year, the patent noted that, if touch sensors are to correctly identify the presence and location of a touch event, then the back plane of the touch sensor panel needs to be reliably grounded. If the back plane isn’t, then sensors may behave sporadically and misrepresent touch events or fail.”Touch sensors may misrepresent the touch event. These misrepresentations can include, but are not limited to, errors in the location of a touch event or the detection of a phantom touch in the absence of an actual touch event. In extreme cases, the touch sensors may fail altogether.” The patent said the various embodiments in the disclosure are designed to provide a reliable ground connection even in the presence of failure conditions. Providing a reliable ground connection for the back plane may be useful in providing a uniform electrical reference point to measure changes in voltage and capacitance from a touch event. The patent signals Apple’s ongoing development of multi-touch for its iDevices.The “Glass” patent, titled “Glass alignment for high temperature processes,” was filed in 2009. The patent said that “Apparatus, systems and methods for alignment of a glass member for high temperature processing are disclosed. The high temperature processing can, for example, pertain to a slumping process to mold glass into a predetermined shape (e.g., a three-dimensional shape). In one embodiment, a glass slumping system can have a mold and an alignment system that support a glass member to be slumped relative to the mold. The alignment system may have a plurality of alignment members being configured to move away from the glass member as the temperature increases during the slumping process to allow the glass member to bend around the mold without interference.”This second patent appears to have drawn the most interest from Apple watchers, casting bets that it may signal introductions of bendable phones and other such devices. The new patent details a way to use heat to achieve a particular shape. The patent suggests ways to shape glass without having to undergo a long process and involving risky chemicals. The patent’s suggested embodiments of the glass invention are discussed: “The apparatus, systems and methods for alignment of a glass member for high temperature processing are suitable for glass covers assembled in small form factor electronic devices, such as handheld electronic devices,” it said, but also listed more embodiments. “The apparatus, systems and methods can also be used for glass covers or displays for other relatively larger form factor electronic devices (e.g., portable computers, tablet computers, displays, monitors, televisions, etc.).” Citation: Apple wins multi-touch and glass process patents (2012, December 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-apple-multi-touch-glass-patents.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

New study finds stars in metalrich galactic areas explode more violently

first_img(Phys.org) —A team of researchers working in China has found evidence to suggest that stars that exist in metal-rich galactic areas tend to explode more violently when they go supernova, than do stars that explode in less metal-rich areas. In their paper published in the journal Science, describing their research, the team details how after analyzing data from the remnants of 188 type 1a supernovas, they found that those stars that existed in metal-rich areas and maybe in younger systems, tended to produce more violent explosions and associated diverse spectral features. Citation: New study finds stars in metal-rich galactic areas explode more violently (2013, March 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-stars-metal-rich-galactic-areas-violently.html Supernova progenitor found? Explore further This is the remnant of a supernova. Credit: NASA/MPIA/Calar Alto Observatory, Oliver Krause et al. © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: Evidence for Two Distinct Populations of Type Ia Supernovae, Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1231502ABSTRACTType Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used as excellent standardizable candles for measuring cosmic expansion, but their progenitors are still elusive. Here, we report that the spectral diversity of SNe Ia is tied to their birthplace environments. We find that those with high-velocity ejecta are substantially more concentrated in the inner and brighter regions of their host galaxies than are normal-velocity SNe Ia. Furthermore, the former tend to inhabit larger and more-luminous hosts. These results suggest that high-velocity SNe Ia likely originate from relatively younger and more metal-rich progenitors than normal-velocity SNe Ia, and are restricted to galaxies with substantial chemical evolution. Scientists have come to believe that supernovas come about in a process that involves a white dwarf. But because a single white dwarf isn’t large enough to set off an explosion, they believe a second star must be involved as well—either another white dwarf as a binary system or via accretion of material by a companion star. Researchers can’t tell using current methods which was involved when studying particular supernovas. In this new effort, the researchers believe they might have found a way to do so.By studying and comparing the spectral features of 188 type 1a supernovas and the galactic geography of the area in which they exploded, the researchers discovered what they believe is a pattern that they claim hints at the nature of the progenitor star that led to the explosion—those in metal-rich areas tended to produce more violent explosions. This suggest it’s more likely that the more violent explosions are the result of a white dwarf pulling mass from a companion star—one similar to our own, or perhaps a red giant—than the result of a binary white dwarf system exploding.Understanding the nature of supernovas is critical to understanding the universe in general, as they are used to measure distances between objects—such measurements have led to the discovery that the universe is expanding, for example. For that reason, it would be helpful to know which sorts of stars lead to their creation and why they behave the way they do when they explode. This new research appears to be one more step in that direction. Journal information: Science This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Best of Last Week – Tricking the uncertainty principle how brains work

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In the biological sciences, a team of neuroscientists showed how the brain works during meditation, and it apparently does so in different ways depending on which type of meditation you’re doing. Another team has found the brain’s response to sexual images is linked to the number of sexual partners. It seems the more real-world sexual encounters with different people a person has, the more strongly they react to sexual imagery—a find that just might cause advertisers to react.It’s also been a good week for technology as researchers developed an ultra-fast bionic arm that can catch objects on the fly. It sits there waiting, then reacts in less than a second, manipulating its parts to allow it to catch all manner of objects, from tennis rackets to soda bottles. Very impressive. Also, Power Japan Plus announced a dual carbon battery that charges 20 times faster than current lithium ion batteries—it’s made mostly of carbon grown from cotton fibers and doesn’t overheat. Maybe electric cars will be the wave of the future after all. And speaking of the future, operation of the longest superconducting cable worldwide started—engineers in Essen, Germany are laying down the cable between two power transformers in the city, it transports five times more power than conventional lines and is far more efficient.And finally, sadly, it appears that drinking wine and eating chocolate won’t keep you alive longer as diets rich in antioxidant resveratrol fail to reduce deaths, heart disease or cancer—the study by a team at John’s Hopkins University found that anecdotal evidence of health benefits from the chemical were completely misguided. Sad, very sad indeed. Citation: Best of Last Week – Tricking the uncertainty principle, how brains work during mediation and bad news for resveratrol (2014, May 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-week-uncertainty-principle-brains-bad.html Power Japan Plus announces dual carbon battery that charges 20 times faster than current lithium ion batteries Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) image of graphene on Ir(111). The image size is 15 nm × 15 nm. Credit: ESRFcenter_img Explore further © 2014 Phys.org (Phys.org) —It’s been an exciting week in physics, first, scientists discovered how to turn light into matter after 80-year quest at Imperial College in London—turns out, Breit and Wheeler were right when they suggested back in 1934 that all it would take would be smashing two photons together. Another team of physicists showed unlimited heat conduction in graphene—they’ve demonstrated via simulations and experiments that the temperature conductivity of graphene deviates depending on the size of samples. Also, a team of researchers at CalTech has found a way of tricking the uncertainty principle—taking measurements that go beyond the limits imposed by quantum physics. And in a spectacular feat of applied physics, a one-nm-thick graphene engine mimicking a two-stroke engine has been developed by a team of researchers at the National University of Singapore. Instead of a piston, a spot on a sheet of graphene is heated till it blisters, then is allowed to cool so it goes flat again—over and over.last_img read more

Finetuning organic circuits Monolayer terminal groups and molecular junctions

first_img Citation: Fine-tuning organic circuits: Monolayer terminal groups and molecular junctions (2015, April 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-fine-tuning-circuits-monolayer-terminal-groups.html Journal information: Journal of the American Chemical Society One way to quantitatively compare one monolayer to another is to measure electron tunneling between the electrode and the junction point at the terminal end of the monolayer. Lead author, Kung-Ching Liao of George M. Whitesides’s group at Harvard University investigated whether decreasing the strength of the interaction between the monolayer’s terminal group and the Ga2O3 interface would decrease the tunneling current density of the monolayer. Their work was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.Prior studies by Whitesides’s group looked at how electron tunneling changes when the atom that is coordinated to the metal electrode (the anchor) is changed, or when the organic components (the backbone) between the anchor and the terminal group are changed. Their prior research revealed that increasing the strength of the terminal group interaction with Ga2O3 did not increase tunneling current density; however, decreasing the interaction between the terminal group and Ga2O3 junction seemed to decrease it. In this study, Liao et al. sought to investigate the mechanism for this decrease in tunneling current density.To understand this mechanism, they needed to make a direct comparison between two similar monolayers and their terminal groups. They chose to compare a monolayer comprised of C-H bonds with a monolayer that has some or all C-H bonds replaced with C-F bonds. The C-F bond is less polarizable than the C-H bond and has a longer bond length than C-H. Additionally, changing the hydrogens on an aliphatic carbon chain to fluorine decreases the energy of the HOMO and, in a monolayer, disrupts van der Waals interactions between alkyl chains. By investigating the effects of changing these factors, Liao et al. were able to discern the primary cause for the change in electron tunneling density.They found that changing the backbone from (CH2)n to (CF2)n had a small, but noticeable effect on the tunneling density. This effect was not enough to account for the differences noted in prior experiments. However, when they changed the terminal group from CH3 to CF3, they found that this factor alone, accounted for the change in electron tunneling density. Whether the backbone was an n-alkyl chain or para-substituted omega-tolyl-alkanoates or oligophenyl carboxylates, the rate of charge transport across the CF3 terminal group and Ga2O3 from the EGaIn tip differed from the CH3 equivalent by a factor of 25 to 30. This discovery allows for additional fine-tuning of an organic circuit by selecting a particular backbone and anchor with desirable electronic properties. It also sheds light on the importance of the terminal group junction interaction. (Phys.org)—Self-assembled monolayers are organic molecules that spontaneously coordinate to a metal surface. If this metal surface is an electrode, then a current can pass through the organic monolayer and interact with a second electrode on the terminal side of the molecule. This current can be controlled by changing the characteristics of the organic molecule, such as making it longer or adding polar substituents or other functional groups. This tailoring of organic circuits is part of a bigger project of creating organic-based electronics. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2015 Phys.org Study demonstrates an electronic switch based on stereoisomerism Explore further More information: “Fluorination and tunneling across molecular junctions” J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2015, 137 (11), pp 3852–3858. DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b00137AbstractThis paper describes the influence of the substitution of fluorine for hydrogen on the rate of charge transport by hole tunneling through junctions of the form AgTSO2C(CH2)n(CF2)mT//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where T is methyl (CH3) or trifluoromethyl (CF3). Alkanoate-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) having perfluorinated groups (RF) show current densities that are lower (by factors of 20–30) than those of the homologous hydrocarbons (RH), while the attenuation factors of the simplified Simmons equation for methylene (β = (1.05 ± 0.02)nCH2–1) and difluoromethylene (β = (1.15 ± 0.02)nCF2–1) are similar (although the value for (CF2)n is statistically significantly larger). A comparative study focusing on the terminal fluorine substituents in SAMs of ω-tolyl- and -phenyl-alkanoates suggests that the C–F//Ga2O3 interface is responsible for the lower tunneling currents for CF3. The decrease in the rate of charge transport in SAMs with RF groups (relative to homologous RH groups) is plausibly due to an increase in the height of the tunneling barrier at the T//Ga2O3 interface, and/or to weak van der Waals interactions at that interface.last_img read more

Study shows microplastics in biowaste wind up in organic compost and fertilizers

first_img Explore further © 2018 Phys.org More information: Organic fertilizer as a vehicle for the entry of microplastic into the environment, Science Advances  04 Apr 2018: Vol. 4, no. 4, eaap8060, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aap8060AbstractThe contamination of the environment with microplastic, defined as particles smaller than 5 mm, has emerged as a global challenge because it may pose risks to biota and public health. Current research focuses predominantly on aquatic systems, whereas comparatively little is known regarding the sources, pathways, and possible accumulation of plastic particles in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated the potential of organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation and composting as an entry path for microplastic particles into the environment. Particles were classified by size and identified by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. All fertilizer samples from plants converting biowaste contained plastic particles, but amounts differed significantly with substrate pretreatment, plant, and waste (for example, household versus commerce) type. In contrast, digestates from agricultural energy crop digesters tested for comparison contained only isolated particles, if any. Among the most abundant synthetic polymers observed were those used for common consumer products. Our results indicate that depending on pretreatment, organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation and composting, as applied in agriculture and gardening worldwide, are a neglected source of microplastic in the environment. Flash floods found to send massive amount of microplastics from rivers to the sea Credit: CC0 Public Domain Plastic particles in fertilizers from organic waste: (A) polystyrene particle. (B and C) polyethylene fragments. (D) polyamide particle. (E) PET fibre. (F) polystyrene fragment. Credit: Sarah Piehl Microplastics have been in the news a lot of late, due mainly to their presence in water, but they may be causing unknown problems on land, as well. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if microplastic bits that make their way into uneaten food or farmer plant waste could also make their way into fertilizers that are made using organic waste. To find out, they tested samples from a wide variety of commercially available organic fertilizers.Organic fertilizer is made the old-fashioned way—by letting microorganisms break down organic material. It is made via aerobic and anaerobic processes. Aerobic composting plants create fertilizer by mixing organic matter with soil and allowing microbes to break it down into material suitable for feeding to plants. An anaerobic biowaste digester, on the other hand, is a facility where organic material is thrown into a sealed vat where it is “digested” to produce both fertilizer and biogas.The testing by the researchers was done on fertilizers made in facilities in Germany, which is unique, because Germany is a country that is serious about dealing with organic waste such as table scraps or food that has gone bad in the fridge. Thus, in addition to paper bins, most Germans also have bins for disposing of such materials. Those materials are sent to processing plants where it is cleaned and combed before conversion into fertilizer. Such facilities also collect plant waste from farms.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In their study, the researchers tested samples from both aerobic and anaerobic facilities, and also from a control facility that used only plant waste from a farm They found some amount of microplastics in all of the samples they tested except those from the control farm. They further found that the amount of microplastics depended on the process used at a given plant and that there tended to be more in the fertilizer from the aerobic facilities. They suggest microplastics wind up in biowaste due to their presence in foods, and also from being collected or stored in plastic containers. A team of researchers at the University of Bayreuth in Germany has found that microplastics that make their way into biowaste can show up in organic composts and fertilizers. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their results when testing organic composts and fertilizers from several processing plants. Citation: Study shows microplastics in biowaste wind up in organic compost and fertilizers (2018, April 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-microplastics-biowaste-compost-fertilizers.html Journal information: Science Advanceslast_img read more

Want Turkish lamps

first_imgThe ongoing India International Trade Fair has a whole host of participants from across the globe thronging Pragati Maidan — bringing the best of products from their homeland. Countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, Hong Kong, Iran, Cuba, Vietnam, Myanmar, Nepal, Egypt, Turkey, Iran, South Africa, Ghana, Republic of Belarus, Thailand, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Myanmar have all put up stalls at Hall 6 and 18 with homegrown crafts and products.Our neighbours Bangladesh and Pakistan have brought their rich weaves and textiles and one can pick up (depending on the budget) designerwear and even local weaves. Karachi salwars and the latest fashion collections from different parts of Pakistan are all there. One could also find tables and crockery made from onyx and rich handcrafts from the tribal belts of Pakistan. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Bangladeshi saris, textiles and weaves are both colourful and quite cheap compared with its Indian counterparts. Their stall also has rich jute products like bags and home decor items on display.When you enter Hall no. 18, you get to see colourful items from countries like Thailand. From hair accessories to small clips, brooches,  to colourful lanterns, sandals, and pumps for as cheap as Rs 200— you can get them all here.  Leather shoes cost between Rs 400 and Rs 700. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixYou can also buy interesting collections of wind chimes, jewelleries, stone ornaments, knits, cotton garments, pullovers for winters and other wollen items.Sri Lanka exhibited a range of  decorative artificial flowers and gems. Myanmar also had a rich display of stone and gemstones.The Turkey stall was filled with a rich collection of lamps, ceramic pottery pieces priced at Rs 200 a piece. Paintings, calligraphy on metal, metal imagery of pyramids, of the Sphinx and dead Pharaohs all formed a part of the exhibition from Egypt. Iran brought in dry fruits, saffron and sweets which the country is known for.At the South Africa stall, there are colourful beaded ornaments, specially crafted and sculpted structures of birds, lamp shades, wall hangings, wooden pots, hand painted and beaded crockery, colourful dolls in South African tribal attires, masks, pillows, bags made out of waste, knitted crochets, frames, beaded cutleries and more. The Ghana stall has wooden handicrafts, alongwith traditional masks and basket weaves on display.Want home utility products? Head to the Hong Kong stall for mink blankets, cushion covers,  bed spread and crockery.    Experiencing the culture of so many different countries, give your home a global touch at IITF. We would say you won’t come back disappointed. But yes, load your purse before going.last_img read more

Bonding with bond

first_imgFifty years after creating his muse, the man behind super spy James Bond emerged from hibernation at the Jaipur Literature Festival 2013 which paid an ode to the spy and its creator in a special session ‘Ian Fleming and the Making of James Bond’ to the delight of at least 400 Bond fans who spilled over at the venue. With latest release Skyfall still fresh in the memory of the audience, the panel of Fleming biographer Andrew Lycett, Bond writer Sebastian Faulks and novelist Zach O Yeah forged an instant conenct with the audience.last_img read more