Slow traffic worsens commuters woes

first_imgTraffic are seen on Dhaka-Mymensingh. Photo: Prothom AloCommuters leaving the capital for home ahead of Eid-ul-Fitr are suffering as traffic appears very slow at key exit routes of the city.Police said the excessive number of buses on the Dhaka-Tangail, Dhaka-Mymensingh and Dhaka-Aricha highways are causing the Eid goers so much suffering.Buses on the Dhaka-Aricha highway from Jahangirnagar University to Nabinagar were seen moving very slowly.Savar traffic police inspector Abul Hossain said three vehicles broke down on the Dhaka-Aricha highway between Savar and Bishmai areas, causing long tailbacks.Vehicles are seen on Dhaka-Tangail highway. Photo: Prothom AloKonabari highway police officer-in-charge Hossain Sarkar said vehicular movement was normal on the Dhaka-Tangail highway. But, buses were moving slowly in some areas of Gazipur due to excessive numbers of buses on the highway.If weather remains good, holidaymakers could go home hassle-free, the police officer observed. Kaliakair upazila police station inspector Masud Alam said as many as 1000 members of police and community police have been deployed on the highways.He also told Prothom Alo that buses were moving slowly on the Dhaka-Mymensingh highway between Tongi and Gazipur areas, but no there were no tailbacks there.last_img read more

Argentine navy hunts for missing submarine

first_imgARA San Juan submarine in Buenos Aires. The Argentine submarine is still missing in Argentine waters after it lost communication more than 48 hours ago. AFP file photoArgentina’s navy was hunting Friday for one of its submarines, which has been reported missing in the South Atlantic with a crew of 44 on board.The navy said it had not had any contact with the submarine, the San Juan, for 48 hours.“We have not been able to find, or have visual or radar communication with the submarine,” navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told a news conference.The United States, Britain and Chile had offered “logistical support and information exchange in this humanitarian search,” the foreign ministry in Buenos Aires said.The TR-1700 class diesel electric submarine had been returning from a routine mission to Ushuaia near the southernmost tip of South America, to its base at Mar del Plata, around 400 kilometers (240 miles) south of Buenos Aires.The San Juan’s last contact with the navy command was on Wednesday morning, Balbi said.Argentina said it had launched an air and sea search on Thursday, involving a destroyer and two corvettes.An initial search in an area around the sub’s last known position, some 430 kilometers off the southeastern Valdez peninsula, provided no clues.Balbi said an initial search was hampered “because it was carried out at night and in bad meteorological conditions prevailing in the area of operations.”The three navy ships and two aircraft flying rotations had “already swept 15 percent of the search area,” Balbi told reporters.The vessel had not activated its emergency beacon, he said.The navy denied a press report that there may have been a fire onboard.Balbi appealed for caution.“I don’t want to dramatize the issue. We’re lacking communication and don’t know what happened,” he said.“There may be a battery issue, a problem of power supply,” the spokesman said, adding that navy protocol was that the submarine would surface if any power problems were detected.The San Juan sailed 10 days ago from Mar del Plata to Ushuaia. It spent three days there before heading back to base, Balbi said.Among those on board is Argentina’s first female submarine officer, 35-year-old weapons officer Eliana Krawczyk.“Let us pray that nothing has happened to any crew member. At sea they are all brothers, and a submarine carries more risk than a ship,” her father Eduardo told Todo Noticias TV.The San Juan is one of three submarines in the Argentine fleet.Sixty-five meters (213 feet) long and seven meters wide, it was built by Germany’s Thyssen Nordseewerke and launched in 1983.It underwent a re-fit between 2007 and 2014 to extend its usefulness by some 30 years.last_img read more

No religious persecution in Bangladesh Hasina tells Gulf News

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina during her interaction with Gulf News in Abu Dhabi. – Photo courtesy: Gulf NewsPrime minister Sheikh Hasina has wondered why India’s parliament passed ‘Indian Citizenship Amendment Bill’ meant to give citizenship to minorities that faced “religious persecution” in neighbouring countries, including Bangladesh.The Bangladesh premier expressed her views in an interview with Gulf News in the UAE capital on Tuesday.“Why [us] this bill…I don’t understand,” she was quoted to have said. “Is it for election purpose?” Sheikh Hasina reportedly asked with a smile.Gulf News quoted her as saying that she never felt that the bill meant to blame Bangladesh for religious persecution of minorities in the country.“I don’t think so. There is no such [religious persecution] in Bangladesh. Some incidents have happened. But we took immediate action,” the premier was quoted to have said.She said religious extremism and terrorism are a global problem. “It is not in Bangladesh alone.”Sheikh Hasina reportedly said her understanding was that people in India are also not happy with the bill. “I think they [India] should not do anything that create tension.”Referring to her actions against Indian insurgents, who tried to operate from Bangladesh, she said, “They should consider all these factors as a neighbouring country.”last_img read more

NSA deletion of call records raising questions

first_imgUSA Falag. Photo: ReutersThe National Security Agency is deleting more than 685 million call records the government obtained since 2015 from telecommunication companies in connection with investigations. And that is raising questions about the viability of the program.The NSA’s bulk collection of call records was initially curtailed by Congress after former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked documents revealing extensive government surveillance. The law, enacted in June 2015, said that going forward, the data would be retained by telecommunications companies, not the NSA, but that the intelligence agency could query the massive database.Now the NSA is deleting all the information it collected from the queries. The agency released a statement late Thursday saying it started deleting the records in May after reports of irregularities.last_img read more

Jim Carrey Ron Howard Among Celebrities Threatened on Twitter by Mail Bomb

first_imgA number of those threats included screen grabs from news stories about murders, plane crashes, and other violent incidents, while others featured gory imagery of decapitated animals. “Not option no way out silence no shots, no traces like never existed,” the suspect wrote in a tweet directed at Warren. Other tweets ended with the line “Hug your loved ones real close every time you leave your home.”Fox News contributor Rochelle Ritchie said Friday that she reported such a tweet by the suspect earlier this month — only to be told by Twitter that “there was no violation of the Twitter Rules against abusive behavior.” Popular on Variety CREDIT: Screenshot: Twitter Twitter responded to this late Friday evening, tweeting that it made a mistake when it rejected the report. “The tweet clearly violated our rules and should have been removed,” the company said in a tweet.  “We are deeply sorry for that error.”In a separate incident, the suspect apparently posted what appeared to be the home address of George Soros on Twitter, which also represents a clear violation of the company’s rules.“We want Twitter to be a place where people feel safe, and we know we have lot of work to do,” the company concluded Friday night.Update: This post was updated multiple times throughout the day following the suspension of Sayoc’s Twitter accounts as well as a statement made by the company late Friday. Twitter accounts linked to the man arrested for allegedly sending mail bombs to an ever-growing list of Trump critics previously threatened a number of celebrities and politicians on Twitter. In at least one case, the social media company seems to have refused to take steps against such a threat.A Twitter spokesperson declined to comment on Friday, referring to the issue as “an ongoing law enforcement investigation.” The company suspended two accounts associated with the suspect Friday afternoon, and on Friday night tweeted that it was “deeply sorry” for not having acted earlier.Authorities identified the suspect of the mail bombing campaign as Cesar Altieri Sayoc, a Florida resident. Soon after the arrest, Twitter users began to unearth two accounts featuring selfies of the suspect, including a video that was likely taken at a Trump rally. Sayoc apparently used these accounts to directly threaten a number of actors and politicians, including Jim Carrey, Ron Howard, Rob Reiner, George Soros, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, and others. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Study shows microplastics in biowaste wind up in organic compost and fertilizers

first_img Explore further © 2018 Phys.org More information: Organic fertilizer as a vehicle for the entry of microplastic into the environment, Science Advances  04 Apr 2018: Vol. 4, no. 4, eaap8060, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aap8060AbstractThe contamination of the environment with microplastic, defined as particles smaller than 5 mm, has emerged as a global challenge because it may pose risks to biota and public health. Current research focuses predominantly on aquatic systems, whereas comparatively little is known regarding the sources, pathways, and possible accumulation of plastic particles in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated the potential of organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation and composting as an entry path for microplastic particles into the environment. Particles were classified by size and identified by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. All fertilizer samples from plants converting biowaste contained plastic particles, but amounts differed significantly with substrate pretreatment, plant, and waste (for example, household versus commerce) type. In contrast, digestates from agricultural energy crop digesters tested for comparison contained only isolated particles, if any. Among the most abundant synthetic polymers observed were those used for common consumer products. Our results indicate that depending on pretreatment, organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation and composting, as applied in agriculture and gardening worldwide, are a neglected source of microplastic in the environment. Flash floods found to send massive amount of microplastics from rivers to the sea Credit: CC0 Public Domain Plastic particles in fertilizers from organic waste: (A) polystyrene particle. (B and C) polyethylene fragments. (D) polyamide particle. (E) PET fibre. (F) polystyrene fragment. Credit: Sarah Piehl Microplastics have been in the news a lot of late, due mainly to their presence in water, but they may be causing unknown problems on land, as well. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if microplastic bits that make their way into uneaten food or farmer plant waste could also make their way into fertilizers that are made using organic waste. To find out, they tested samples from a wide variety of commercially available organic fertilizers.Organic fertilizer is made the old-fashioned way—by letting microorganisms break down organic material. It is made via aerobic and anaerobic processes. Aerobic composting plants create fertilizer by mixing organic matter with soil and allowing microbes to break it down into material suitable for feeding to plants. An anaerobic biowaste digester, on the other hand, is a facility where organic material is thrown into a sealed vat where it is “digested” to produce both fertilizer and biogas.The testing by the researchers was done on fertilizers made in facilities in Germany, which is unique, because Germany is a country that is serious about dealing with organic waste such as table scraps or food that has gone bad in the fridge. Thus, in addition to paper bins, most Germans also have bins for disposing of such materials. Those materials are sent to processing plants where it is cleaned and combed before conversion into fertilizer. Such facilities also collect plant waste from farms.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In their study, the researchers tested samples from both aerobic and anaerobic facilities, and also from a control facility that used only plant waste from a farm They found some amount of microplastics in all of the samples they tested except those from the control farm. They further found that the amount of microplastics depended on the process used at a given plant and that there tended to be more in the fertilizer from the aerobic facilities. They suggest microplastics wind up in biowaste due to their presence in foods, and also from being collected or stored in plastic containers. A team of researchers at the University of Bayreuth in Germany has found that microplastics that make their way into biowaste can show up in organic composts and fertilizers. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their results when testing organic composts and fertilizers from several processing plants. Citation: Study shows microplastics in biowaste wind up in organic compost and fertilizers (2018, April 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-microplastics-biowaste-compost-fertilizers.html Journal information: Science Advanceslast_img read more