New Service Aims to Help Publishers Bypass Google

first_imgWhile the debate over “Google: Friend or Foe” continues with magazine and online content publishers, a new service from MashLogic offers publishers a way to keep readers at their sites without having to look up related topics on Google or Bing. MashLogic has developed two semantic tools, “2Stay” and “2Go,” that identify and link to related topics and terms. “If you’re interested in a certain topic like sports or music, this would automatically identify links to those topics like players and teams or performers,” said CEO Ranjit Padmanabhan.” The service is customizable for the host site. On Goal.com, a soccer-dedicated site and early MashLogic client, a series of red dots are visible under linkable terms which take the reader to other contextually relevant articles at the site. MashLogic is currently on 14 of Goal’s international language sites and in front of approximately 10 million monthly uniques. “This offers the ability to expose the reader to additional content,” said vice president of business development John Bryan. “There is a great degree of positive churn with stories and we’re making older content relevant by bringing it in front of the user. This also reinforces the relevance of your brand to the user and can increasing page clickthrough and time on site, which leads to higher CPMs and advertiser satisfaction.” Bryan said the tool has particular appeal for publishers in three areas: fast-moving news, celebrity stories and sports. Past articles can be presented in a vertical timeline or horizontally across different categories. In a demo for the NewYorkTimes.com, the term “Meryl Streep” on the home page generated 10 related stories in the past seven days that had been on the site across blogs, movie reviews, fashion, finance and celebrity. The minimum requirement for a publisher is to have an RSS feed which they can turn over to MashLogic for indexing, as well as implementation of a few lines of java script. Publishers can also restrict certain terms (such as the name of a competitive site). “We have found MashLogic to be a valuable tool in both retaining users on Goal.com and encouraging them to return to the site for access to related content,” said Ron Elwell, president and COO of Goal.com. “We generate upwards of 60,000 articles each month, and MashLogic encourages our visitors to read and engage more with them. It also diverts users back towards Goal.com in coordination with our content, and the tool is in line with our aim of equipping each user with the functionality to seek out information.”Free To Publishers (With an Eye on Revenue Sharing) MashLogic is currently free to publishers and is looking at developing a revenue share model on product links to sites such as iTunes and Amazon, as well as product sales (such as a soccer jersey) on sites like Goal.com.last_img read more

Who Is Andy Grammer And What Are The Good Parts Required Listening

first_img “Required Listening” On Julia Michaels’ “Issues” Listen: Cold War Kids | “Required Listening” “Required Listening” On Julia Michaels’ “Issues” Scott Goldman and Julia MichaelsPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Johnny Mathis, Babyface | “Required Listening” Cold War Kids and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Listen: Justin Tranter | “Required Listening” Listen: Aloe Blacc | “Required Listening” Scott Goldman and Julia MichaelsPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Jeff LynnePhoto: Lester Cohen/WireImage Cold War Kids and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com “Required Listening”: New GRAMMY Museum Podcast Diddy, Heather Parry | “Required Listening” Billy Porter Jr. and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/Getty Images Johnny Mathis, Babyface | “Required Listening” Aloe BlaccPhoto: Courtesy of GRAMMY Museum Weezer and Scott Goldman (right)Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com “Required Listening” Podcast Listen: Keith Urban | “Required Listening” Email Andy Grammer and Scott Goldman Listen: Justin Tranter | “Required Listening” Diddy, Heather Parry | “Required Listening” Andy Grammer and Scott Goldman “Required Listening” Dan Auerbach Listen: Cold War Kids | “Required Listening” Listen: Weezer | “Required Listening” I’m With HerPhoto: Jason Kempin/AMA/Getty Images Diddy, Heather Parry | “Required Listening” I’m With Her | “Required Listening” Listen: Keith Urban | “Required Listening” “Required Listening”: New GRAMMY Museum Podcast Jeff LynnePhoto: Lester Cohen/WireImage Listen: Andy Grammer | “Required Listening” I’m With Her | “Required Listening” Keith Urban and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Matt Winkelmeyer/WireImage.com Justin Tranter and Scott Goldman Hear It Now: Alessia Cara | “Required Listening” News Andy Grammer and Scott Goldman Listen: Jeff Lynne | “Required Listening” Erika Ender | “Required Listening” Podcast “Required Listening” Spotlights ‘The Defiant Ones’ Who Is Andy Grammer And What Are ‘The Good Parts’? | “Required Listening” Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Alessia Cara and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Hear It Now: Alessia Cara | “Required Listening” I’m With HerPhoto: Jason Kempin/AMA/Getty Images Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Listen: Aloe Blacc | “Required Listening” Listen: Andy Grammer | “Required Listening” who-andy-grammer-and-what-are-good-parts-required-listening Jeff LynnePhoto: Lester Cohen/WireImage Johnny Mathis, Babyface | “Required Listening” Aloe BlaccPhoto: Courtesy of GRAMMY Museum Facebook Imagine DragonsPhoto: Alison Buck/Getty Images Sheryl Crow and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Timothy Norris/WireImage.com Sheryl Crow and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Timothy Norris/WireImage.com Listen: Keith Urban | “Required Listening”center_img Jimmy Iovine, Scott Goldman and Allen HughesPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com (L-R) Heather Parry, Sean “Diddy” Combs, Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/Getty Images Subscribe To “Required Listening” And Listen Now At Apple MusicRead more Twitter Alessia Cara and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Imagine DragonsPhoto: Alison Buck/Getty Images Keith Urban and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Matt Winkelmeyer/WireImage.com Listen: Weezer | “Required Listening” I’m With Her | “Required Listening” (L-R) Heather Parry, Sean “Diddy” Combs, Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/Getty Images Alessia Cara and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com “Required Listening” Spotlights ‘The Defiant Ones’ Listen: Jeff Lynne | “Required Listening” Prev Next Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com “Required Listening” On Julia Michaels’ “Issues” Justin Tranter and Scott Goldman Listen: Jeff Lynne | “Required Listening” “Required Listening”: New GRAMMY Museum Podcast Jimmy Iovine, Scott Goldman and Allen HughesPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Listen: Sheryl Crow | “Required Listening” Listen: Andy Grammer | “Required Listening” Sheryl Crow and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Timothy Norris/WireImage.com “Required Listening” Billy Porter Jr. Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Listen: Aloe Blacc | “Required Listening” Listen: Sheryl Crow | “Required Listening” Listen: Andy Grammer | “Required Listening” Billy Porter Jr. and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/Getty Images I’m With HerPhoto: Jason Kempin/AMA/Getty Images “Required Listening” Billy Porter Jr. Imagine DragonsPhoto: Alison Buck/Getty Images Hear It Now: Alessia Cara | “Required Listening” Weezer and Scott Goldman (right)Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Keith Urban and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Matt Winkelmeyer/WireImage.com (L-R) Heather Parry, Sean “Diddy” Combs, Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/Getty Images “Required Listening” Dan Auerbach Listen: Cold War Kids | “Required Listening” Listen: Sheryl Crow | “Required Listening” L.A.-based singer/songwriter opens up about fatherhood, collaboration and how he came up with the goods for his third studio LPTim McPhateGRAMMYs May 3, 2018 – 4:50 pm Andy Grammer’s remarkable music career has taken him from strumming a guitar on Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica, Calif., to crafting multi-platinum pop hits in the recording studio. On this week’s episode of the GRAMMY Museum’s “Required Listening” podcast, the prolific singer/songwriter shared the biggest lesson he learned from performing on the streets for complete strangers.Listen Now: “Required Listening” Episode With Andy Grammer”The number one thing [I learned from busking] is the ability to just act without any guarantee of anything happening in return,” said Grammer. “There’s no greater place to do that every day than [on] the street because there’s nobody there [to see] you. … It’s a great muscle to build.”In a wide-ranging chat with GRAMMY Museum Executive Director/host Scott Goldman, the “Fresh Eyes” singer also shared how fatherhood and collaboration sparked the songwriting process for his latest album, The Good Parts, and why albums provide for a truer snapshot of a musician’s art.”One of the biggest benefits of writing with others is that it makes you write,” said Grammer, who collaborated with songwriters Ian Kirkpatrick and Ross Golan, among others, on the new LP. “If you have a session on the books with somebody else, you’re going to write a song that day. If you have a session by yourself, you might. That’s just real.”Speaking of real, nothing can prepare you for the real emotions that hit you upon becoming a first-time parent. For Grammer, he channeled his feelings into “Always,” an angelic tribute to his newborn daughter featured on The Good Parts.”It definitely opens you up to a whole new area of life, which is fun to write about,” said Grammer. “It’s such a big thing that when you’re able to distill it down to a line, it holds. When you say to your daughter, ‘You and me will be always,’ that’s like a simple little line that means [so much].”As far as the modern debate over releasing songs versus albums? Put Grammer down as “pro-album.””With one song, you can get an idea,” said Grammer. “With 12 songs you can get a real sense of where somebody is.”As you go along creating art, you have a feeling of how you personally feel about it. And you go about the process of trying to get it out of yourself. And then [you] give it to [the fans].” Weezer and Scott Goldman (right)Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Listen: Justin Tranter | “Required Listening” Listen: Weezer | “Required Listening” Scott Goldman and Dan AuerbachPhoto: Alison Buck/Getty Images Cold War Kids and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com “Required Listening” Billy Porter Jr. Scott Goldman and Julia MichaelsPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Jimmy Iovine, Scott Goldman and Allen HughesPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com “Required Listening” Spotlights ‘The Defiant Ones’ Photo: Rebecca Sapp/WireImage.com Aloe BlaccPhoto: Courtesy of GRAMMY Museum Scott Goldman and Dan AuerbachPhoto: Alison Buck/Getty Images “Required Listening” Dan Auerbach Erika Ender | “Required Listening” Podcast Justin Tranter and Scott Goldman Scott Goldman and Dan AuerbachPhoto: Alison Buck/Getty Images Billy Porter Jr. and Scott GoldmanPhoto: Rebecca Sapp/Getty Images Erika Ender | “Required Listening” Podcastlast_img read more

VIDEO Watch 5th Grade 6th Grade Bands Winter Concert

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Public Schools’ 5th Grade and 6th Grade Bands held their Winter Concert on Tuesday, December 18, 2018 in the Wilmington High School Auditorium.Wilmington Community Television was on hand to cover the concert. Watch it below:—Video Playerhttps://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/wilmington/6/8/1/9/c/d/6819cd6b-e5c9-4c74-b29a-21f422f879931545254266.257%2B50036965.300%40castus4-wilmington%2B15453185441545316888440681.vod.720p.20181218_5th%20and%206th%20grade%20band%20concert.mp41.mp4Media error: Format(s) not supported or source(s) not foundmejs.download-file: https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/wilmington/6/8/1/9/c/d/6819cd6b-e5c9-4c74-b29a-21f422f879931545254266.257%2B50036965.300%40castus4-wilmington%2B15453185441545316888440681.vod.720p.20181218_5th%20and%206th%20grade%20band%20concert.mp41.mp4?_=100:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor: WOW Factor Auto Detailing Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Watch 2019 Wilmington Spring Strings FestivalIn “Videos”VIDEO: Watch 2019 Wilmington Spring Band FestivalIn “Videos”VIDEO: Watch ‘The Back Track Band’ Perform A Concert On The CommonIn “Videos”last_img read more

Dance Theatre of Harlem Performance

first_imgThe world-renowned Dance Theatre of Harlem (DTH) performs live, 8 p.m., June 20 at the Carl J. Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State University. The performance is co-presented by the Reginald F. Lewis Museum and Murphy Fine Arts Center. This special performance is in conjunction with the exhibition Dance Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of Firsts, on display at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, and is DTH’s only headlining Mid-Atlantic appearance in 2015. Contact Mitch Case at (410) 243.3790 for more information.last_img read more

Best of Last Week – Tricking the uncertainty principle how brains work

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In the biological sciences, a team of neuroscientists showed how the brain works during meditation, and it apparently does so in different ways depending on which type of meditation you’re doing. Another team has found the brain’s response to sexual images is linked to the number of sexual partners. It seems the more real-world sexual encounters with different people a person has, the more strongly they react to sexual imagery—a find that just might cause advertisers to react.It’s also been a good week for technology as researchers developed an ultra-fast bionic arm that can catch objects on the fly. It sits there waiting, then reacts in less than a second, manipulating its parts to allow it to catch all manner of objects, from tennis rackets to soda bottles. Very impressive. Also, Power Japan Plus announced a dual carbon battery that charges 20 times faster than current lithium ion batteries—it’s made mostly of carbon grown from cotton fibers and doesn’t overheat. Maybe electric cars will be the wave of the future after all. And speaking of the future, operation of the longest superconducting cable worldwide started—engineers in Essen, Germany are laying down the cable between two power transformers in the city, it transports five times more power than conventional lines and is far more efficient.And finally, sadly, it appears that drinking wine and eating chocolate won’t keep you alive longer as diets rich in antioxidant resveratrol fail to reduce deaths, heart disease or cancer—the study by a team at John’s Hopkins University found that anecdotal evidence of health benefits from the chemical were completely misguided. Sad, very sad indeed. Citation: Best of Last Week – Tricking the uncertainty principle, how brains work during mediation and bad news for resveratrol (2014, May 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-week-uncertainty-principle-brains-bad.html Power Japan Plus announces dual carbon battery that charges 20 times faster than current lithium ion batteries Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) image of graphene on Ir(111). The image size is 15 nm × 15 nm. Credit: ESRFcenter_img Explore further © 2014 Phys.org (Phys.org) —It’s been an exciting week in physics, first, scientists discovered how to turn light into matter after 80-year quest at Imperial College in London—turns out, Breit and Wheeler were right when they suggested back in 1934 that all it would take would be smashing two photons together. Another team of physicists showed unlimited heat conduction in graphene—they’ve demonstrated via simulations and experiments that the temperature conductivity of graphene deviates depending on the size of samples. Also, a team of researchers at CalTech has found a way of tricking the uncertainty principle—taking measurements that go beyond the limits imposed by quantum physics. And in a spectacular feat of applied physics, a one-nm-thick graphene engine mimicking a two-stroke engine has been developed by a team of researchers at the National University of Singapore. Instead of a piston, a spot on a sheet of graphene is heated till it blisters, then is allowed to cool so it goes flat again—over and over.last_img read more