Officials Relaunch Effort to Add Mare Island to National Park System

first_imgThe city of Vallejo, Calif., and the Mare Island Historic Park Foundation have rekindled their bid to add the 161-year-old Mare Island Naval Shipyard to the national park system.Incorporation into the National Park Service would prevent the shipyard’s historic structures from falling into disrepair and keep shipyard artifacts from being scattered across the country, according to the foundation.The effort to integrate the historic sections of the shipyard, located in the northeastern portion of the San Francisco Bay area, into the park system began after the site was designated for closure in 1993, according to Dennis Kelly, a project manager for the foundation. In 2011, the National Park Service turned down such a request over concerns about the cost of repairs needed by the site’s historic resources and the ongoing cleanup, rather than its lack of suitability.A park service study of the proposal concluded that there are “no other sites that tell the story of the development of naval facilities on the West Coast over the period of history covered by Mare Island Naval Shipyard.”The park service previously had said preserving the shipyard’s historic resources should be one of the highest priorities in planning for the site’s reuse, Kelly said.Mare Island was established in 1854 as the first naval base on the West Coast. Its primary mission was to build, maintain, and repair Navy ships and submarines. More than 500 ships were built there before its closure in 1996.Incorporating Mare Island into the park system would support Vallejo’s effort to boost tourism by promoting its naval heritage. The foundation has preserved and maintained historical buildings at the shipyard, but the group is looking for the National Park Service to step in to provide additional resources, Kelly said.Lennar continues to redevelop Mare Island, a National Historic Landmark, according to a plan calling for 1,400 homes, 7 million square feet of commercial and industrial space, and recreational areas. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Tesla rolls out Dog Mode Sentry Mode to keep your car and

first_img More From Roadshow Electric Cars Tesla Model 3 barrels through the snow in Track Mode 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 3 Tesla The other update is Sentry Mode, which is intended to provide a little more security when a Tesla is parked. When the car is set to Sentry Mode, it will display a warning on the car’s infotainment system if a “minimal threat” is detected. For a more severe security issue, such as someone breaking a window, Sentry Mode will sound the car’s alarm and begin playing music through the audio system at full volume, as well as alerting the car’s owner via the Tesla smartphone app. (Tesla doesn’t specify what music will be played, but hopefully it’s something loud and attention-getting, rather than, say, soothing classical.)In addition, when Sentry Mode is triggered, the car will retain recorded footage from its built-in cameras for the 10-minute period prior to the alarm activation. The footage can be downloaded onto a USB stick, presumably for sharing with your insurance agency or local law enforcement.It’s worth noting that Sentry Mode is not automatically activated. Owners must choose the option every time they park the car and want to use it. The software update is rolling out to Model 3 sedans today, and will soon become available on Model S and Model X vehicles built after August 2017.There’s one final safety and security upgrade that Tesla announced today. The car’s built-in dashcam function will now also record video from the car’s side-mounted cameras, in addition to the forward-facing camera. That could provide even more evidence for an insurance claim after a car accident, for instance. 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Tags Comments 50 Photos Tesla is rolling out new software features designed to help drivers of its electric cars keep their dogs safe, as well as their vehicles. CEO Elon Musk had hinted at the arrival of the Dog Mode and Sentry Mode functions earlier this week, and now both offerings are official.Keep your furry friends cool and happy while you run into the store. Tesla Dog Mode is designed for owners who might want to leave their furry companion inside a car — while running an errand, for instance — without risking the dangers of overheating cars. To use the feature, drivers pull up the car’s climate control options, select Keep Climate On and choose the Dog setting, then set a temperature preset. The Tesla will then keep the car’s cabin at a safe temperature while showing a message on the infotainment system so that passersby don’t worry about Fido’s health.Running the climate control while the car is parked will of course use some battery charge, so Tesla says that owners will receive an alert on their mobile app if the car’s battery drops to 20 percent charge while using Dog Mode. Tesla also notes that drivers should check if there are any local laws prohibiting leaving a dog in the car before using the function. Dog Mode builds on Tesla’s existing Cabin Overheat Protection function, which can activate the climate control to prevent the inside of the car getting dangerously hot to keep animals or children safe. 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Tesla Share your voicelast_img read more

8 killed in road crashes in 3 districts

first_imgRoad accident illustration by Prothom AloAt least eight people were killed and 20 others injured in road accidents in Cox’s Bazar, Chandpur and Magura districts on Friday, reports UNB.In Cox’s Bazar, three people were killed and 10 others injured when a truck plunged into a ditch near Cox’s Bazar-Teknaf Marine Drive at Noakhalipara Kochchopia of Teknaf around 1:30pm.The identities of the deceased could not be known immediately, said Pradeep Kumar Das, officer-in-charge of Teknaf Police Station.Two other people, including a woman, were killed and eight others injured as a bus and a microbus collided head-on on Cox’s Bazar-Chattogram road in Khutakhali Medhakachchapia area around 1:00pm.Sub-inspector of Malumghat Highway Police Jasim Uddin said they seized the buses and the bodies were sent to Sadar Hospital for autopsy.The deceased are Raushon Ara, 42, wife of certain Khalilur Rahman of Uttar Phulchhari village of the upazila, and Sonak Paul, 27, son of Dipak Paul of Dulahazra area of the upazila.In Magura, a father and minor boy were killed and mother injured in a head-on collision at Ichakha at night.The deceased were Krishna Kumar Bashar, 32, and his son Samya Kumar Bashar, 5, of Laxmikandi village in Sadar upazila.The accident took place on Dhaka-Magura Highway when a speeding microbus collided with their motorcycle around 8:30pm, leaving them critically injured, said Sirajul Islam, officer-in-charge of Magura Sadar Police Station.On information, police took them to Magura Sadar Hospital where doctors declared the father and son dead, the OC said.In another accident, a motorcyclist was killed on the spot when his bike crashed into a human-hauler at Kanchanpur village of Sadar upazila.The deceased was identified as Sohagh Mollah, 25, son of Wahab Mollah of Chhaniarpara village in Shalikha upazila, police said.last_img read more

Carry a PC in Your Pocket

first_imgFebruary 21, 2008 Listen Now Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. A notebook PC is a handy thing to have, but lugging one around everywhere you go can be downright inconvenient. Fortunately, there’s a solution that fits right in your pocket: The ubiquitous USB flash drive, often called a keychain or thumb drive.With the right device and software, you can plug your flash drive into a computer at an Internet cafe, hotel business center, or elsewhere, and have all the tools and files you need to do your work–complete with your own personal launch menu. Sure, you can use online applications like Google Docs or Zoho Office (see Life Without Desktop Software for more on these), but a flash drive lets you carry a much wider variety of the applications, utilities, and other fun doodads you’ve come to depend on.Here’s everything you need, from hardware to software and beyond, to get going in the world of pocket computing.Harness the Right HardwareTo get the most out of portable computing, you need a good flash drive. Here are some things to consider:Take a drive on the reading edge. The faster your flash drive, the more smoothly programs will run. When shopping for a drive, look at the specs and try to find one with a read rate of 15 mbps (megabits per second; in megabytes, 1.9 MBps) or faster. If you already have a flash drive, you can test its speed with a free utility like HDTach for Windows.Look for high-speed USB. A USB 2.0 flash drive will perform much better than USB 1.x. Make sure the drive you buy specifies USB 2.0 or “high-speed USB.”U3 or not U3? Some flash drives (notably those from SanDisk) are labeled “U3,” meaning they use a proprietary format to create applications for USB drives. Such drives usually come with a built-in pop-up program launcher called LaunchPad and a few programs, or they at least link to a Web page for downloading and installing free and for-pay U3 applications. SanDisk claims that only U3-compatible programs will run on such a drive, but I had no problem running U3 and non-U3 programs side by side on the same memory stick. (However, don’t expect your non-U3 apps to show up on the U3 launch menu.)With so many portable applications available from a variety of free sources these days, you don’t necessarily have to get a U3-equipped drive. If you do have one, you can either take advantage of the LaunchPad feature and its various apps, or you can find utilities for removing U3 LaunchPad software from SanDisk drives and from non-SanDisk drives. And if you change your mind about such removal, SanDisk has a free tool for getting it back.Snag the Best SoftwareOnce you’ve got the flash drive of your choice, it’s time to stock up with the tools you’ll need when you’re away from your regular system. The term “portable software” usually refers to an application that can run from a single folder (usually on a removable device) without adding any files or Registry entries to the host system. Although this leaves out the traditional behemoths like Microsoft Office or Adobe’s Creative Suite, you can still find a lot of handy software that meets the portable requirement.Your suite is waiting. If you want an all-in-one package of basics–spreadsheet, word processor, graphics–you can have your pick of portable suites, all completely free (in some cases, donations are accepted).An excellent collection is Portable Apps, which comes in two sizes, Standard (260MB installed) and Lite (105MB installed). Both versions include an antivirus program, a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox), an instant messenger (Gaim), a Sudoku game, a calendar and task manager (Mozilla Sunbird), and an e-mail client (Mozilla Thunderbird). The Standard version also comes with a portable version of the OpenOffice suite, while the Lite version has the AbiWord word processor instead.Another all-in-one free collection can be found in winPenPack. The winPenPack suites come in more flavors than Portable Apps–Essential, 1Gb, School, Game, Web–and there is even an option to make your own. You can also download individual applications. The offerings fall into a wide range of categories–from office, Internet, graphics, multimedia, and development to security, system, and utilities. The choices include considerable overlap with PortableApps, with both offering Mozilla and OpenOffice products, for example.What’s for launch? Running your portable applications will be easier if you have a pop-up menu launcher. You’ll find one in U3 flash drives, as well as in both PortableApps and winPenPack. In each case, an icon is added to the taskbar tray (the icon-studded area near the clock); click it to see a Start-menu equivalent that lists the applications on your flash drive. Personally, I find the winPenPack launcher to be the most flexible and easiest to customize. You can download this launcher separately from winPenPack. If none of those meet your needs, you can try still another free portable app launcher, PStart, from Pegtop Software.Roam the lands of the free. But big collections are not the only place to find portable applications. Sometimes you can find a portable version of your favorite program just by using your favorite search engine, entering the application name and then “portable” as keywords.Other good places include sites like Portable Freeware and the portable freeware section of Ned Wolf’s Absolutely Free Software site. Another site where you can find a portable section is Snapfiles.Finally, try entering the keyword “portable” in the search box of your favorite software download page–for example, at (where else?) PC World Downloads.Do Right by Your DataWhether you carry your work files with you on your flash drive or store them online, you’ll still need to take some precautions to protect those files, your privacy, and your computers from harm, whether accidental or malicious. Here are some steps to consider.Scan for safety. Since using your USB drive on an unknown computer exposes the drive to additional risks, be sure to install antispyware and antivirus software as part of your set of portable applications. As an additional precaution, scan the flash drive itself from your regular computer the next time you return home to make sure it didn’t pick up any bugs.Use common sense. Because a host computer like one in a hotel business center or an Internet cafe may have keyloggers that record your passwords, portable computing can never be 100 percent safe. But you can limit the risk by avoiding credit-card transactions when using your portable system on another machine. And it goes without saying that you should avoid online banking in these situations.Shred it; don’t sweat it. If you’re working on sensitive documents, you should keep them encrypted while stored on your flash drive. For example, the open-source program TrueCrypt or the freeware archiving program IZarc2Go both offer encryption features that run on a flash drive.In most cases, you’ll have to copy documents out of the encrypted folder or container before working on them, and then copy them back when you’re done. For added security, use a shredding application to destroy the work copies (after you’ve put a copy back in the encrypted folder of course). CyberShredder and UltraShredder are two free portable utilities that do the job.Back up your portable, too. Because these devices are small and easily misplaced, backing up your portable USB “computer” is arguably even more important than the backups you do for your main system. The applications are much smaller, so backing up is faster, and the resulting files take less room on your backup drive. All of the suites mentioned above include backup utilities.Of course, you don’t really need such a utility; you can always just use Explorer to drag and drop the contents of your flash drive to a backup disk. The important thing is to do it regularly. Brought to you by PCWorld 7 min read How Success Happenslast_img read more

New map reveals WiFi passwords at airports around the world

first_img Wednesday, October 12, 2016 New map reveals Wi-Fi passwords at airports around the world << Previous PostNext Post >> Share Posted by TORONTO — Nothing puts fear in the hearts of travellers like the prospect of no Wi-Fi. But fear not – there’s now a handy map that reveals the Wi-Fi passwords of dozens of airports around the world.Anil Polat, a travel blogger and computer security engineer, has done the world a huge service by creating this interactive map (which he regularly updates). Polat, reports Business Insider, hopes to visit every country in the world and has a blog called foXoMad (foxnomad.com), which aims to help people “travel smarter.”The Wi-Fi map is available in iOS, Android and Google Play.Now, travellers will never run the risk of straying too far from Facebook or missing an important email while on the road ever again. Whew. Travelweek Group last_img read more