Tesla rolls out Dog Mode Sentry Mode to keep your car and

first_img More From Roadshow Electric Cars Tesla Model 3 barrels through the snow in Track Mode 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 3 Tesla The other update is Sentry Mode, which is intended to provide a little more security when a Tesla is parked. When the car is set to Sentry Mode, it will display a warning on the car’s infotainment system if a “minimal threat” is detected. For a more severe security issue, such as someone breaking a window, Sentry Mode will sound the car’s alarm and begin playing music through the audio system at full volume, as well as alerting the car’s owner via the Tesla smartphone app. (Tesla doesn’t specify what music will be played, but hopefully it’s something loud and attention-getting, rather than, say, soothing classical.)In addition, when Sentry Mode is triggered, the car will retain recorded footage from its built-in cameras for the 10-minute period prior to the alarm activation. The footage can be downloaded onto a USB stick, presumably for sharing with your insurance agency or local law enforcement.It’s worth noting that Sentry Mode is not automatically activated. Owners must choose the option every time they park the car and want to use it. The software update is rolling out to Model 3 sedans today, and will soon become available on Model S and Model X vehicles built after August 2017.There’s one final safety and security upgrade that Tesla announced today. The car’s built-in dashcam function will now also record video from the car’s side-mounted cameras, in addition to the forward-facing camera. That could provide even more evidence for an insurance claim after a car accident, for instance. 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Tags Comments 50 Photos Tesla is rolling out new software features designed to help drivers of its electric cars keep their dogs safe, as well as their vehicles. CEO Elon Musk had hinted at the arrival of the Dog Mode and Sentry Mode functions earlier this week, and now both offerings are official.Keep your furry friends cool and happy while you run into the store. Tesla Dog Mode is designed for owners who might want to leave their furry companion inside a car — while running an errand, for instance — without risking the dangers of overheating cars. To use the feature, drivers pull up the car’s climate control options, select Keep Climate On and choose the Dog setting, then set a temperature preset. The Tesla will then keep the car’s cabin at a safe temperature while showing a message on the infotainment system so that passersby don’t worry about Fido’s health.Running the climate control while the car is parked will of course use some battery charge, so Tesla says that owners will receive an alert on their mobile app if the car’s battery drops to 20 percent charge while using Dog Mode. Tesla also notes that drivers should check if there are any local laws prohibiting leaving a dog in the car before using the function. Dog Mode builds on Tesla’s existing Cabin Overheat Protection function, which can activate the climate control to prevent the inside of the car getting dangerously hot to keep animals or children safe. 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Tesla Share your voicelast_img read more

No religious persecution in Bangladesh Hasina tells Gulf News

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina during her interaction with Gulf News in Abu Dhabi. – Photo courtesy: Gulf NewsPrime minister Sheikh Hasina has wondered why India’s parliament passed ‘Indian Citizenship Amendment Bill’ meant to give citizenship to minorities that faced “religious persecution” in neighbouring countries, including Bangladesh.The Bangladesh premier expressed her views in an interview with Gulf News in the UAE capital on Tuesday.“Why [us] this bill…I don’t understand,” she was quoted to have said. “Is it for election purpose?” Sheikh Hasina reportedly asked with a smile.Gulf News quoted her as saying that she never felt that the bill meant to blame Bangladesh for religious persecution of minorities in the country.“I don’t think so. There is no such [religious persecution] in Bangladesh. Some incidents have happened. But we took immediate action,” the premier was quoted to have said.She said religious extremism and terrorism are a global problem. “It is not in Bangladesh alone.”Sheikh Hasina reportedly said her understanding was that people in India are also not happy with the bill. “I think they [India] should not do anything that create tension.”Referring to her actions against Indian insurgents, who tried to operate from Bangladesh, she said, “They should consider all these factors as a neighbouring country.”last_img read more

8 killed in road crashes in 3 districts

first_imgRoad accident illustration by Prothom AloAt least eight people were killed and 20 others injured in road accidents in Cox’s Bazar, Chandpur and Magura districts on Friday, reports UNB.In Cox’s Bazar, three people were killed and 10 others injured when a truck plunged into a ditch near Cox’s Bazar-Teknaf Marine Drive at Noakhalipara Kochchopia of Teknaf around 1:30pm.The identities of the deceased could not be known immediately, said Pradeep Kumar Das, officer-in-charge of Teknaf Police Station.Two other people, including a woman, were killed and eight others injured as a bus and a microbus collided head-on on Cox’s Bazar-Chattogram road in Khutakhali Medhakachchapia area around 1:00pm.Sub-inspector of Malumghat Highway Police Jasim Uddin said they seized the buses and the bodies were sent to Sadar Hospital for autopsy.The deceased are Raushon Ara, 42, wife of certain Khalilur Rahman of Uttar Phulchhari village of the upazila, and Sonak Paul, 27, son of Dipak Paul of Dulahazra area of the upazila.In Magura, a father and minor boy were killed and mother injured in a head-on collision at Ichakha at night.The deceased were Krishna Kumar Bashar, 32, and his son Samya Kumar Bashar, 5, of Laxmikandi village in Sadar upazila.The accident took place on Dhaka-Magura Highway when a speeding microbus collided with their motorcycle around 8:30pm, leaving them critically injured, said Sirajul Islam, officer-in-charge of Magura Sadar Police Station.On information, police took them to Magura Sadar Hospital where doctors declared the father and son dead, the OC said.In another accident, a motorcyclist was killed on the spot when his bike crashed into a human-hauler at Kanchanpur village of Sadar upazila.The deceased was identified as Sohagh Mollah, 25, son of Wahab Mollah of Chhaniarpara village in Shalikha upazila, police said.last_img read more

TJAM Scholarship Masquerade Gala

first_imgGet out your dancing shoes and wear your masks. It’s time to raise money for scholarships for students attending our great Mississippi HBCUs. On April 8, from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. at Martin’s Crosswinds, 7400 Greenway Center Drive Greenbelt, Md. 20770, a fundraiser will be held to provide scholarships to students from four Mississippi HBCUs: Tougaloo College, Jackson State University, Alcorn State University and Mississippi Valley State University. For more information go to gwdcjsualum.wixsite.com/tjam2017.last_img read more

Bridgestone is demonstrating its AeroBee ereader

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Most e-readers are E-Ink. On devices, such as the very popular Amazon Kindle, they allow users to have a clear and paper-like viewing experience, and no glare in high light or outdoor situations. The E-Ink devices also use less power than devices like the iPad, and therefore have a longer battery life. Citation: Bridgestone is demonstrating its AeroBee e-reader (2011, April 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-bridgestone-aerobee-e-reader.html E Ink, maker of Kindle display, to offer color Explore furthercenter_img More information: www.bridgestone.com/products/d … r/aerobee/index.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com These devices do have some drawbacks as well. The E-Ink devices only do black and while screens, and for the current generation at least, they have a refresh rate that is so low that is makes animation an impossibility. Like all things in technology however those limitations are bound to change. Companies are working on the next generation of E-Ink devices, and Bridgestone is showing off its offering.Bridgestone’s new e-reader, dubbed the AeroBee, features a QR-LPD display that can run at a resolution of 800 x 600. The device is also capable of showing images in color and acting as a touch screen. The machine, which will take input with a stylus, allows users to interact with their text. The device is also flexible. Yes, you read that right, it is flexible.The screen works with a completely new approach to the E-Ink concept. The AeroBee uses black and white electrified powder, which acts like a liquid. When electric current is run though it the black powder is move to the front or back of the display, depending on how the current is applied. The stylus helps to move the powder over the screen, creating new configurations on the screen. With the use of color filters the screen can also apply up to 4,096 colors onto a screen as big as 13.1-inches.No product price or specific time line for launch have been give at this time.last_img read more

Study shows microplastics in biowaste wind up in organic compost and fertilizers

first_img Explore further © 2018 Phys.org More information: Organic fertilizer as a vehicle for the entry of microplastic into the environment, Science Advances  04 Apr 2018: Vol. 4, no. 4, eaap8060, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aap8060AbstractThe contamination of the environment with microplastic, defined as particles smaller than 5 mm, has emerged as a global challenge because it may pose risks to biota and public health. Current research focuses predominantly on aquatic systems, whereas comparatively little is known regarding the sources, pathways, and possible accumulation of plastic particles in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated the potential of organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation and composting as an entry path for microplastic particles into the environment. Particles were classified by size and identified by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. All fertilizer samples from plants converting biowaste contained plastic particles, but amounts differed significantly with substrate pretreatment, plant, and waste (for example, household versus commerce) type. In contrast, digestates from agricultural energy crop digesters tested for comparison contained only isolated particles, if any. Among the most abundant synthetic polymers observed were those used for common consumer products. Our results indicate that depending on pretreatment, organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation and composting, as applied in agriculture and gardening worldwide, are a neglected source of microplastic in the environment. Flash floods found to send massive amount of microplastics from rivers to the sea Credit: CC0 Public Domain Plastic particles in fertilizers from organic waste: (A) polystyrene particle. (B and C) polyethylene fragments. (D) polyamide particle. (E) PET fibre. (F) polystyrene fragment. Credit: Sarah Piehl Microplastics have been in the news a lot of late, due mainly to their presence in water, but they may be causing unknown problems on land, as well. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if microplastic bits that make their way into uneaten food or farmer plant waste could also make their way into fertilizers that are made using organic waste. To find out, they tested samples from a wide variety of commercially available organic fertilizers.Organic fertilizer is made the old-fashioned way—by letting microorganisms break down organic material. It is made via aerobic and anaerobic processes. Aerobic composting plants create fertilizer by mixing organic matter with soil and allowing microbes to break it down into material suitable for feeding to plants. An anaerobic biowaste digester, on the other hand, is a facility where organic material is thrown into a sealed vat where it is “digested” to produce both fertilizer and biogas.The testing by the researchers was done on fertilizers made in facilities in Germany, which is unique, because Germany is a country that is serious about dealing with organic waste such as table scraps or food that has gone bad in the fridge. Thus, in addition to paper bins, most Germans also have bins for disposing of such materials. Those materials are sent to processing plants where it is cleaned and combed before conversion into fertilizer. Such facilities also collect plant waste from farms.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In their study, the researchers tested samples from both aerobic and anaerobic facilities, and also from a control facility that used only plant waste from a farm They found some amount of microplastics in all of the samples they tested except those from the control farm. They further found that the amount of microplastics depended on the process used at a given plant and that there tended to be more in the fertilizer from the aerobic facilities. They suggest microplastics wind up in biowaste due to their presence in foods, and also from being collected or stored in plastic containers. A team of researchers at the University of Bayreuth in Germany has found that microplastics that make their way into biowaste can show up in organic composts and fertilizers. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their results when testing organic composts and fertilizers from several processing plants. Citation: Study shows microplastics in biowaste wind up in organic compost and fertilizers (2018, April 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-microplastics-biowaste-compost-fertilizers.html Journal information: Science Advanceslast_img read more