Twelve fading Indian handicrafts on display at Delhi exhibition

first_imgA set of 12 ‘languishing’ crafts, including Akola and Nandana hand block prints, Mashru, Rangkat and Garad Korial silk weave, Rogan paintings and Chamba Rumal art, is the focus of a new exhibition, which opened at the Central Cottage Industries Corporation (CCIC) Emporium, here on August 1. The exhibition was inaugurated by Shantmanu, IAS Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) Chairman CCIC, Ministry of Textile, Govt of India. These are among the 55 handicrafts and handloom arts identified by the Ministry of Textiles as endangered with limited practitioners and craftspeople. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainThe exhibition ‘Kala Sampada’ focuses on 12 of these crafts – five handicrafts and seven handloom styles – that are fading into oblivion due to changing consumer tastes and new generations of skilled artisans shifting to other occupations to earn a living. “For our national awards each year, we keep five awards reserved for these categories. We also conduct guru-shishya camps for expert artisans to train new entrants. Stalls at exhibition places, like Dilli Haat, are also reserved for them.” Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma Award”To boost sale and marketing, the exhibition at this emporium will help to attract craft lovers and buyers,” said Shantmanu, CCIC Chairman and Textile Ministry Development Commissioner. Other showcased crafts include Matka Noil silk, Patan Patola, Nagpuri Cotton, Lashingpee, silverware, wooden toys of Odisha and Sanjhi craft. For the handloom section, the exhibits are in form of everyday wearables, like sarees, dupattas, men’s clothing, quilts and table mats. The 10-day exhibition-cum-sale is on at the Jawahar Vyapar Bhavan. Central Cottage Industries Corporation of India Ltd. (CCIC), a Public Sector Undertaking under the Ministry of Textiles is engaged in the promotion and retail marketing of best of authentic Indian Handloom and Handicrafts products through its showrooms in New Delhi, Bengaluru, Chennai, Kolkata, Secunderadabad, Patna, and Varanasi. CCIC sources its merchandise directly from, weavers, master weavers, craftsperson, and master crafts person, Shilpgurus, National Awardees and Clusters. CCIC is dedicated to the development of India Crafts and Craftperson thus providing a unique Platform for showcasing and marketing of handicrafts & handlooms products globally.last_img read more

Australia has banned at least four video games in the last three

first_img Tags The 29 best games on the Nintendo Switch Comment 1 DayZ. Bohemia Interactive Australia has long had an issue with video game classification.Thanks to legislation initially put in place in the ’90s, Australia didn’t have an “adults only” or equivalent AO rating until 2013. Until then movies, TV shows and most other media could be rated “R18+,” but not video games. But even after the addition of an R18+ classification for video games, video games are still treated differently in Australia, mainly as a result of the idea that “interactivity” adds impact to any sex, violence or drug use featured. Since the introduction of its R18+ rating, Australia has still banned a significant number of video games. This week has been especially strange.It started with DayZ earlier this month. DayZ, a precursor of games like Fortnite and Apex Legends had been available digitally for years, but as a result of an official retail release, Five Star Games, the local distributor of DayZ, had to go through Australia’s government run classification process, where it was refused classification — effectively banned in Australia.Five Star Games did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Now today, Kotaku Australia has found three more titles that have also been refused classification in Australia. We Happy Few, Hotline Miami and the codenamed “Bonaire”, which is thought to be downloadable content for Red Dead Redemption 2.Interestingly, like DayZ, We Happy Few and Hotline Miami had already been classified in Australia, but as a result of either re-releases or upcoming DLC had to be re-classified. Unlike in regions like Europe or the US, in which industry bodies like the ESRB are trusted to self-regulate the classification of video games or movies, Australia’s classification is government-run. Ratings are provided by the Australian Classification Board. But the board is, for the most part, the messenger, working from guidelines agreed upon by government. Video games in Australia are most frequently banned as a result of drug use. According to the classification guidelines, any video game where drug use is incentivised (as a “power up” that benefits the player for example) can result in a ban. That’s almost certainly why We Happy Few’s DLC was refused classification and it appears to be the reason why DayZ was banned earlier this month.The Australian Classification Board did not immediately respond to a request for comment.center_img Culture Gaming Share your voice 29 Photoslast_img read more

Fabrics and Philosophy

first_imgThe ongoing textile exhibition titled Amoolya at India Habitat Centre brings together a collection of intricately hand-crafted works of textile art by Neha Puri Dhir. The pieces displayed at the show are a part of Dhir’s design practice called Mool. Inspired by the beauty of geometry, Mool brings together fabrics with ancient craft technique. Each piece in Amoolya represents a harmony of structure and fluidity, intention and chance, perfection and imperfection, craft and art, freedom and control. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’It embodies Dhir’s personal interest in the concept of the fundamental – her search for the most basic form of an object or a process. The works presented here are an expression of that search and the culmination of philosophy joining with practice.Each piece bears the mark of the hands it has passed through – from the spinners and weavers of the silk, to the craftsmen who collaborate with Dhir. To her, geometry represents the bridge between art and mathematics. She begins by working with basic shapes and grids, developing them to represent complex ideas using an essential language of dots and lines. Once these sketches are created, she transposes them to the medium of textiles – working with the technique of resist dying as her brush. She has extensive experience working in the field of crafts, education and industry in India. Her specific areas of interest include working with dying techniques in Kutch (Gujarat), exploring shawl weaving in Kullu and Kinnauri (Himachal Pradesh), Tussar silk making in Jharkhand and Tholu Bommalata or leather puppet craft (Andhra Pradesh).When: On till 31 August Where: Art Gallery, India International Centre Time: 11am – 7 pmlast_img read more