Senators propose bill requiring warrants to search devices at the border

first_imgA Customs and Border Protection agent watching surveillance footage. James Martin/CNET If you’re taking a trip in to or out of the US, border agents currently have free rein to search through your digital devices. Unlike police, agents don’t need a warrant to look through your phones, laptops and other electronics. Two US senators are hoping to change that with a bipartisan bill. Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat from Oregon, and Sen. Rand Paul, a Republican from Kentucky, on Wednesday introduced the Protecting Data at the Border Act, which would require agents to obtain a warrant before they can search Americans’ devices at the border. The number of electronic searches at the border has spiked in the last four years. In 2018, the Department of Homeland Security conducted more than 33,000 searches on devices, compared with 4,764 searches in 2015. Customs and Border Protection declined to comment.”The border is quickly becoming a rights-free zone for Americans who travel. The government shouldn’t be able to review your whole digital life simply because you went on vacation, or had to travel for work,” Wyden said in a statement. The bill is also being introduced in the House of Representatives by a group of Democrats. Wyden and Paul introduced the same bill in 2017. Since then, warrantless device searches at the border increased by 10 percent.Law enforcement agencies have been taking advantage of the warrantless searches at the border, using the information discovered in unrelated court cases, the American Civil Liberties Union discovered through its related lawsuit against the DHS. Until a court makes a decision, the agency is still allowed to conduct these searches without a warrant. “Respecting civil liberties and our Constitution actually strengthens our national security, and Americans should not be forced to surrender their rights or privacy at the border,” Paul said. “Our bill will put an end to these intrusive government searches and uphold the fundamental protections of the Fourth Amendment.”  Border wall dividing homes and habitat Politics Security 1 Now playing: Watch this: 2:09 Share your voice Comment Tagslast_img read more

No religious persecution in Bangladesh Hasina tells Gulf News

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina during her interaction with Gulf News in Abu Dhabi. – Photo courtesy: Gulf NewsPrime minister Sheikh Hasina has wondered why India’s parliament passed ‘Indian Citizenship Amendment Bill’ meant to give citizenship to minorities that faced “religious persecution” in neighbouring countries, including Bangladesh.The Bangladesh premier expressed her views in an interview with Gulf News in the UAE capital on Tuesday.“Why [us] this bill…I don’t understand,” she was quoted to have said. “Is it for election purpose?” Sheikh Hasina reportedly asked with a smile.Gulf News quoted her as saying that she never felt that the bill meant to blame Bangladesh for religious persecution of minorities in the country.“I don’t think so. There is no such [religious persecution] in Bangladesh. Some incidents have happened. But we took immediate action,” the premier was quoted to have said.She said religious extremism and terrorism are a global problem. “It is not in Bangladesh alone.”Sheikh Hasina reportedly said her understanding was that people in India are also not happy with the bill. “I think they [India] should not do anything that create tension.”Referring to her actions against Indian insurgents, who tried to operate from Bangladesh, she said, “They should consider all these factors as a neighbouring country.”last_img read more

Fabrics and Philosophy

first_imgThe ongoing textile exhibition titled Amoolya at India Habitat Centre brings together a collection of intricately hand-crafted works of textile art by Neha Puri Dhir. The pieces displayed at the show are a part of Dhir’s design practice called Mool. Inspired by the beauty of geometry, Mool brings together fabrics with ancient craft technique. Each piece in Amoolya represents a harmony of structure and fluidity, intention and chance, perfection and imperfection, craft and art, freedom and control. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’It embodies Dhir’s personal interest in the concept of the fundamental – her search for the most basic form of an object or a process. The works presented here are an expression of that search and the culmination of philosophy joining with practice.Each piece bears the mark of the hands it has passed through – from the spinners and weavers of the silk, to the craftsmen who collaborate with Dhir. To her, geometry represents the bridge between art and mathematics. She begins by working with basic shapes and grids, developing them to represent complex ideas using an essential language of dots and lines. Once these sketches are created, she transposes them to the medium of textiles – working with the technique of resist dying as her brush. She has extensive experience working in the field of crafts, education and industry in India. Her specific areas of interest include working with dying techniques in Kutch (Gujarat), exploring shawl weaving in Kullu and Kinnauri (Himachal Pradesh), Tussar silk making in Jharkhand and Tholu Bommalata or leather puppet craft (Andhra Pradesh).When: On till 31 August Where: Art Gallery, India International Centre Time: 11am – 7 pmlast_img read more